Your Letters & Pictures

A few email about:120 games a years is childe abuse.

As I imagined, my article “120 games a years is child abuse“, provoked a lot of reaction. Unfortunately, only reactions that reinforce the denouncement of it or speek against it, and total silence from the one that can really do something to change for the better. Here a few examples.
_________________________________________

Gianni

I agree with you on the kids are playing too many games per year. When you look at club and High School combined it could be real high. My son will play 19 games for his club team and 27 games for his high school team that starts after club. The problem I see is I cannot get the kids to come to practice . For example last night we had 9 out of our 15 players at practice. This Saturday when it is game time I will have all 15 players in attendance wanting to play. I think we focus on the games too much so all the kids want to do is play games, but they have a hard time executing what they have been taught in practice.

I also liked your article on ODP and how they pick the players. They are not getting the best players at all. My son went to two ODP tryouts and was disappointed in how they even run them and did not want to go back. I later talked to the ODP coach and he sent all the players who showed up for the third tryout just because they showed up to try our for the state team. The coach did not send the best players form our district at all. The boys sent were from families that could afford it and there kids are not that good.

My son is a very good player and could play at the college level one day but I am not going to take him all over and get him on ODP just for a scholarship there has to be a better way.

(email signed)
__________________________________________________

Gianni,

well done as usual. I find I agree with you 90% of the time, maybe more (and you are excused for going pazzo over the WC victory, while I was underwhelmed). Your voice continues, strong, clear and sufficiently radical as to always make for great reading.

I have a couple of points:

120 games a year is Child Abuse

I agree and think it's also coach abuse. With all the driving, planning, coordinating travel, getting there early for warmup, and staying late for post-game talks, what is the effect on the coach? When we see an example of a coach acting inappropriately, losing his temper, even striking an official, maybe we should be wondering how many games a year this person is trying to cover. As a coach, I believe I have to always be "on" from the moment I get out of the car, and 120 performances a year are too many, at least for this diva.

Training may cut female soccer players' knee risks.

I agree again! My key measures for a season's success are:

How many players stayed for the whole season and how many are coming back next year? My goal is 100% except for graduation, moving away, etc.
How many players missed games due to soccer-related injury? My goal is zero misses, but I will always miss it. But one area where I can help is that we do a lot of knee conditioning. I build this into my practice plan.


Jim Broshar (women's varsity coach for St. Mary's College High School in Berkeley)
______________________________________________________________

Gianni,

This is John Prior coach of the SF JR GLENS.

I could not agree with you more with regards to kids playing anything close to 120 games a year, it's definitely CHILD ABUSE. I've spoken to my parents about this issue before, I'm lucky that our group trust me when it comes down to their kids welfare on the field. Gianni I plan on having my team play approx 30 games in the 2006-2007 season.

I will give you one instance of a team playing 112 games two
years ago at U-12 level in order to win a State title. What price did these kids pay? I wonder how many of these kids are still playing, and seriously worry about how many will still be healthy enough to play at U-18 level.

I believe the problem is that too many parents want their kids to be professionals now, by that I mean before they are even young adults, couple this with egotistical coaches who only care about wins and losses and padding their resume, then you have a serious problem
on your hands at the youth soccer level.

Gianni I could go on for a long time with regards to this problem and my observations over the last six years of coaching youth football, lets talk sometime about this.
Regards,

John
0 Comments
Posted on 20 Oct 2006 by coachgianni
Content Management Powered by CuteNews